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Rome Guide

Rome Events

Whats on in Rome

We are based in the heart of Rome in close proximity to some of Rome's finest points of interest. While staying with us visitors can enjoy ease of access to the many events and activities. Below is a taster of what is currently in our beautiful city. Please explore and enjoy.
Museo Nazionale di Castel Sant'Angelo
Museo Nazionale di Castel Sant'Angelo

Lungotevere di Castello, 50, 00193, Roma, Italia

Museo Nazionale di Castel Sant'Angelo

In the district of St. Peter’s, at one end of the Ponte Sant’Angelo bridge, on the right bank of the Tiber, we find the imposing Castel Sant’Angelo. The structure was originally a mausoleum. It had probably been commissioned and built by Hadrian as ...
Museo Nazionale di Castel Sant'Angelo
In the district of St. Peter’s, at one end of the Ponte Sant’Angelo bridge, on the right bank of the Tiber, we find the imposing Castel Sant’Angelo. The structure was originally a mausoleum. It had probably been commissioned and built by Hadrian as a tomb for himself and for his successors. The work was initially undertaken by the architect, Demetrianus, around the year 123. It was completed by Antoninus Pius a year after the Emperor’s death. Since 1925, the structure has hosted the Museo Nazionale di Castel S. Angelo and its historical and arts collections, including relics and other objects of interest regarding the Italian Army, in a monumental setting restored for this purpose. The complex history of this monument, with its many additions and extensions, can be broken down into three principal periods. These periods are represented by the Ancient Roman remains of the imperial mausoleum, by the fortified castle, and by the Papal apartments. These structures host the varied range of exhibits, including sculptures, paintings, works in marble, arms, and furniture and objects acquired from various sources, and in part also recovered during excavation of the spiral ramp of the mausoleum, or transferred from the museums, Museo Nazionale Romano delle Terme di Diocleziano, or the former Museo Artistico Industriale. Some exhibits were purchased from the market for antiquaries or were acquired following the shows set up on the occasion of the universal exhibition, or Esposizione Universale, of 1911. At certain times of the year, the famous “Passetto di Borgo” or “er Corridore” (the corridor) – the fortified and elevated passage on the Mura Vaticane (Vatican walls), linking the Vatican to Castel Sant’Angelo – is open to visitors. With this corridor, leading directly to the castle from the Palaces of the Vatican, Popes were provided with an escape route to the fortress in times of particular unrest. The fortified structure also permitted control of the surrounding district. The strategic importance of the “Passetto” was revealed during the darkest, most mysterious and painful moments of the history of Rome and of the Church itself. Alexander VI Borgia used it in 1494, retreating to the Castello when Rome was overrun by the militias of Charles VIII of France. In 1527, Clement VII Medici (1523-1534) used the passageway to reach the Castello during the Sack of Rome at the hands of the Landsknecht mercenary pikemen under Charles VIII. The passageway’s significance, when its function as a means of defence came to an end at the close of the sixteenth century, then declined. CURIOSITY: In 1527, Pope Clement VII grew a beard, in mourning for Rome, which had been sacked. There are those who say that he grew his beard as a disguise, to facilitate his escape. All the Popes following Clement VII were bearded, up to the time of Paul V.
Lee Madgwick - Stand-by
Lee Madgwick - Stand-by

Via dei Marsi 20-22 Roma

Lee Madgwick - Stand-by

Already considered one of the new masters, Lee Madgwick has been shown among very important realities both in Europe and the US, as Banksy’s last project Dismaland. His work is now arriving in Italy for the first time. His large oil paintings host...
Lee Madgwick - Stand-by
Already considered one of the new masters, Lee Madgwick has been shown among very important realities both in Europe and the US, as Banksy’s last project Dismaland. His work is now arriving in Italy for the first time. His large oil paintings host isolated architectures buried in open spaces lacking in spatial coordinates. Huge buildings represent the ruins of the everyday life, lived among the walls of a concrete universe, which has been shelter, border and Nation at the same time. Already considered one of the new masters, Lee Madgwick has been shown among very important realities both in Europe and the US, as Banksy’s last project Dismaland. His work is now arriving in Italy for the first time. His large oil paintings host isolated architectures buried in open spaces lacking in spatial coordinates. Huge buildings represent the ruins of the everyday life, lived among the walls of a concrete universe, which has been shelter, border and Nation at the same time. The concept of border between internal and external is a hostile thought; it concerns the idea of conservation and containment. Within a saturated atmosphere, the buildings stand out against the ground, as if they were repelling magnets. Others are completely lost, hidden by a nature who regained his own power. Time is stuck in a permanent present, silent and motionless, like a held breath. PROJECT ROOM The artist has created an installation that reproduces an house facade, he has tried to build a visual and a conceptual connection with the structures of his paintings. The idea is to display a true contamination, the ruins of his artworks really seem to invade the gallery's space. The installation is about the dichotomy between the interior and the exterior that exists in everything, so suddenly the viewer appears in front of the structures that Lee Madgwick usually paints abandoned and faraway from the human being. • The Trilogy of Silence Wherever matter exists there is sound. Therefore sound is a mere try out. As it happens with vacuum –another physical phenomenon which exists only theoretically- it’s the most accurate representation of its opposite. Denying sound means to deny the space where it spreads, the air through it lives; it is to give up on mankind. It’s a claustrophobic sphere where nothing happens, where time doesn’t move. Although, the physical impossibility of creating nothingness, has always created a deep, inconclusive, attraction. Robert Rauschenberg made it visible in his White Paintings, monochromatic works where the white pigment on the surface of the canvas. The modular construction made each painting a chapter of a mute, dense narrative. Rauschenberg’s work scattered the conceptual definitions of empty and full, pure and contaminated. He brought the idea of spatial dimension to the maximum philosophical abstraction. Strongly influenced by his research, the artist and composer John Cage, made silence – auditory equivalent of vacuum – his main field of investigation. The climax of his research can be found in the work 4’ 33’’, controversial piece at the limit of performance, completely lacking of sound except for the audience ground noise, each time different, like a subtle and persistent expression of life. Following the same path, the Trilogy of Silence speaks about humanity through its absence. Three artists, three shows, three different languages, where people are described only through their actual or dystopian traces: shadows, architectures, interiors become the most raw, real and poetical expression of themselves. Works submerged by a gravitational force that’s only internal, where sound, time and space are deconstructed to be remembered or denied, sometimes rewritten. Like a season-long videotape, the project will be controlled by Fast Forward, Stand-By and Rewind commands. These are extremely descriptive of the works presented as they refer to the only circumstances where sound exists but can’t be perceived.
Vigamus - The Video Game Museum
Vigamus - The Video Game Museum

via Sabotino, 4 - 00100 ROMA (RM)

Vigamus - The Video Game Museum

The Video Game Museum of Rome, is managed by VIGAMUS Foundation, body recognized by the Prefecture of Rome with a positive opinion of the Ministry of Arts and Culture and Tourist - Protocol 976/2014 - set up in June 2013 and committed to the preserv...
Vigamus - The Video Game Museum
The Video Game Museum of Rome, is managed by VIGAMUS Foundation, body recognized by the Prefecture of Rome with a positive opinion of the Ministry of Arts and Culture and Tourist - Protocol 976/2014 - set up in June 2013 and committed to the preservation, research and divulgation of physical and digital works linked to the digital medium. Mass phenomenon, artistic expression and interactive medium of the digital Era, Games are part of the contemporary imagination, becoming one of the most complex meanings production systems. By nature related to the technological component, Games are constantly evolving, revolutionizing the whole system of Arts, and combining with it. The aim of the Foundation is to promote VIGAMUS and spread awareness of the cultural value of video games in Italy, a country characterized by a wide audience of players. Video games are going to be included into the historical and artistical heritage of our beautiful country, whose primacy in the world is absolutely indisputable. Cultural innovation, rather than the technology, is the basis for the emergence of a true Game Culture. Interactive artifacts that deserves to be known and studied, and first of all, preserved.
EVOCA1 – MERCY
EVOCA1 – MERCY

Via di San Salvatore in Campo 51, 00186 Roma, Italia

EVOCA1 – MERCY

On May 6 2017, Galleria Varsi presents “Mercy”, the first Italian show by the artist Evoca1, a Dominican figurative painter, currently resident in Miami. The artist researches human conflicts and reveals them in public spaces, where his personal h...
EVOCA1 – MERCY
On May 6 2017, Galleria Varsi presents “Mercy”, the first Italian show by the artist Evoca1, a Dominican figurative painter, currently resident in Miami. The artist researches human conflicts and reveals them in public spaces, where his personal history and his vision take shape. “Misericordia ” (Mercy) is a 12th century dueling dagger with a triangular blade, which thanks to its structure and sturdiness was able to go through armors. The name derives from the function that it historically covered; the dagger brought death to opponents on battlefields, sparing the fallen from agony and giving them death. A dramatic image that embodies a precious value: in the irreconcilability of a clash, death and suffering generate responsibilities towards every man. The artist analyzes a key sentiment of Ancient Rome, the pietas, which was sung by Virgil in Aeneid and developed in the figure of “Pius Aeneas”. This value expresses all the duties men have towards humankind, their families and the gods. This is not a natural disposition of the human soul, but must be cultivated daily with devotion and diligence. Pietas pushes men out of themselves, one towards the other, between heaven and earth. But is it really possible to talk about pietas today? What does the “other” represent for us? “Mercy” derives from these questions by bringing to the spaces of Galleria Varsi thoughts on an extinct virtue, now more necessary than ever. Mercy has always been a necessary emotion that has been practiced by few and yearned by many. If we look back to our history, there has always been this constant battle for power and resources, where the strongest fight amongst each other for total control and the less privileged fight to survive at their mercy. This has been the constant cycle of humanity and is always present as a relevant issue. The show “Mercy” is a metaphor for the reflection of our current time”. The artist rejects the cultural and political context in which he lives, where a missing alienated individual is incapable of meeting, joining other people, and urges us to rediscover the true meaning of the word community (from the Latin communitas: cum munus ), mistakenly interpreted from current thought: “The munus that a communitas shares is not a property or a belonging. It is not a having something, but, on the contrary, a debt, a pledge, a gift-to-give”, as stated by the philosopher Roberto Esposito. Our education does not end in independence, but is fulfilled in the infinite exercise of dependence, of continuity with others. The artist reminds us that the biological project of human beings, unlike other species, requires others to develop, to complete, to survive (or die).
Circo Massimo
Circo Massimo

Via del Circo Massimo

Circo Massimo

An impressive archaeological site located at Circus Maximus will open to the public on November 17th. After 2800 years of history, this hidden treasure will finally be unveiled. Over the centuries, this imposing site has been the scene of many tran...
Circo Massimo
An impressive archaeological site located at Circus Maximus will open to the public on November 17th. After 2800 years of history, this hidden treasure will finally be unveiled. Over the centuries, this imposing site has been the scene of many transformations. Indeed, horse races, public executions, religious processions and theatrical performances have taken place in this central area of Rome. Circus Maximus also transformed itself during the nineteenth century to host agricultural productions, mills and small craft shops. Visitors may access the site by Piazza di Porta Capena.
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